Bottlenose dolphin quick facts



    Quick Facts Bottlenose Dolphin
    Infraorder Cetacea
    Family Delphinidae
    Genus Tursiops
    Species 1. Common bottlenose dolphin
    2. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin
    3. Australian bottlenose dolphin (Burrunan dolphin)
    Weight Coastal ecotype = average 190-260 kg (419-573 lbs.)
    Offshore ecotype = average 454 kg (1,000 lbs.)
    Size Coastal ecotype : 8 - 10 ft. (2.5 - 3 meters)
    Offshore ecotype : 11 - 13 ft. (3.4 - 4 meters)
    Diet Fish, shrimp, squids, eels, and crustaceans
    Gestation Period 12 months
    Lifespan Males: 40 - 50 years
    Females: 50 - 60 years


    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - Odontoceti (toothed whales) and Mysticeti (baleen whales) Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle.
    Most of the living bottlenose dolphins belong to one of the two main species:

    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)

    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    The word "cetacean" is derived from the Greek word for whale, kētos.


    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Evolution

    Scientists believe that early whales arose 50 million years ago from primitive mammals that ventured back into the sea.
    Two small rod-shaped pelvic bones, buried deep in the body muscle of toothed whales, may be remnants of the hind limbs of these primitive mammals. Biochemical and genetic studies suggest that even-toed ungulates, especially hippopotamuses, are Bottlenose dolphins' closest living terrestrial relatives.
    Modern forms of both odontocetes and mysticetes appear in the fossil record five to seven million years ago.
    The genus Tursiops first appears in the fossil record about five million years ago.
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    Hippopotamus is bottlenose dolphin's closest living terrestrial relative.

    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Life Cycle

    A female dolphin can potentially bear a calf every two years, but calving intervals generally average three years. The gestation period is about 12 months.
    A bottlenose dolphin calf is typically born tail-first to prevent drowning. After the mother breaks the umbilical cord by swiftly swimming away, she immediately returns to her baby and take it to the surface to breathe.
    Calves are approximately 100 to 135 cm (39-53 in.) long and weigh about 10 to 20 kg (22-44 lb.). The calf suckles from nipples concealed in abdominal mammary slits. A calf may nurse for up to 18 months. Bottlenose dolphins become sexually mature at various ages, usually occurring between 5 and 12 years.
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    A bottlenose dolphin calf is typically born tail-first to prevent drowning.


    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Diet & eating habits

    Dolphins eat a wide variety of fishes, squids, and crustaceans such as shrimps. Bottlenose dolphins often cooperate when hunting and catching fish. Dolphins do not chew their food. Before eating large fishes, bottlenose dolphins shake them or rub them on the ocean floor until suitable-size pieces break off. They also strip meat from spiny fishes, reducing the chance of injury from sharp spines.
    Adult bottlenose dolphins eat approximately 4% to 6% of their body weight in food per day. A nursing mother's daily intake is considerably higher — about 8%.
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    A bottlenose dolphin's stomach is compartmentalized for rapid digestion. Adults eat about 4-5% of their body weight per day.

    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Habitat

    Bottlenose dolphins live in a variety of habitats, from coastal waters to the open ocean. Their habitat is generally limited to those regions of world seas whose surface water temperatures are in the range of 10° to 32°C (50° to 90° F) Scientists recognize two bottlenose dolphin ecotypes - coastal and offshore.
    Coastal ecotype dolphins have adapted for warm, shallow waters. Their smaller bodies and larger flippers support maneuverability and heat dissipation.
    Offshore ecotype dolphins have adapted for cooler, deeper waters.
    Bottlenose dolphins living within 7.5 km (4.65 miles) of shore were coastal ecotypes. Bottlenose dolphins living beyond 34 km (21 miles) from shore were offshore ecotypes.
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    Bottlenose Dolphin's milk is composed of 33% fat, 7% protein, and 60% water, with traces of lactose. The fat-rich milk helps the baby rapidly develop the much needed thick layer of blubber.

    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Intelligence

    Bottlenose dolphin brains are larger than many other mammals of the same body size.
    Bottlenose dolphins living within 7.5 km (4.65 miles) of shore were coastal ecotypes. Bottlenose dolphins living beyond 34 km (21 miles) from shore were offshore ecotypes.
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    Bottlenose dolphins have the third largest brain in the world weighing about 1.5 kg (Average human brain weighs about 1.2 kg)

    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Sleep

    Bottlenose dolphin sleep with one eye open and the other closed. Unlike humans, Bottlenose need to be awake to breathe. To prevent drowning while sleeping only half of the dolphin’s brain goes to sleep while the other half remains awake so they can continue to breathe. When the left brain sleeps, the right eye is closed and when the right half sleeps the left eye is closed.
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    Bottlenose dolphins sleep with one eye open and the other closed.

    Bottlenose dolphins - Facts and Information

    Migration

    Variations in water temperature, movements of food fish, and feeding habits may account for the seasonal movements of some dolphins to and from certain areas. Some coastal dolphins in higher latitudes show a clear tendency toward seasonal migrations, traveling farther south in the winter. For example, coastal bottlenose dolphins on the Atlantic side of the U.S. migrate seasonally between New Jersey and North Carolina. Coastal dolphins in warmer waters show less extensive, localized seasonal movements.
    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
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    Bottlenose dolphins - migration

    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    As a result of evolution, Bottlenose dolphin's nostrils merged into a single hole and it slowly migrated from its nose (or rostrum) to the top of its head (melon), making it easier to breath when swimming or resting partly under water.
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Physical Characteristics

    Differences in size may be related to coastal and offshore ecotype variances, and geographical locations. Offshore ecotypes, adapted for cooler waters, tend to be larger than inshore ecotypes. On average, full-grown males are slightly longer than females, and considerably heavier. A bottlenose dolphin's skin color is gray to dark gray on its back, fading to white on its lower jaw and belly. This coloration, a type of camouflage known as countershading, may help conceal a dolphin from predators and prey. When viewed from above, a dolphin's dark back surface blends with the dark depths. When seen from below, a dolphin's lighter belly blends with the bright sea surface. Some bottlenose dolphins show spots on their bellies or light streaks along their sides. Many populations of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins are ventrally spotted.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    Bottlenose dolphins are warm-blooded and their body temperature is around 37 ℃ (98 ℉), which is almost the same as that of humans
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - toothed whales and baleen whales. Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and known to use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate explosives on the ocean floors.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    A bottlenose dolphin's outermost skin layer will be replaced every two to four hours to get rid of any algae and bacteria that tend to stick to the skin. This also reduces the drag and improves the speed of the swim.
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - toothed whales and baleen whales. Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and known to use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate explosives on the ocean floors.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    Bottlenose dolphins have about 36 to 52 teeth on the upper jaw and about 30 to 48 teeth on the lower jaw.
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - toothed whales and baleen whales. Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and known to use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate explosives on the ocean floors.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    A dolphin's eyes move independently of each other. Bottlenose dolphins see quite well both below and above the water.
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - toothed whales and baleen whales. Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and known to use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate explosives on the ocean floors.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    A dolphin's pectoral flipper contains five digits similar to that of a human hand.
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - toothed whales and baleen whales. Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and known to use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate explosives on the ocean floors.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    Ocean’s water is too salty for Bottlenose dolphins, so they do not drink it. They get their water from the food they eat and by burning their fat.
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - toothed whales and baleen whales. Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and known to use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate explosives on the ocean floors.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    Bottlenose dolphins are color-blind and hence cannot see blue color.
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - Introduction

    Whales are mammals and belong to the order "cetacea". They are divided into two classes - toothed whales and baleen whales. Dolphins are toothed whales. Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and known to use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate explosives on the ocean floors.
    Interesting Bottlenose dolphin facts
    Bottlenose dolphins are one of only three species that engage in sex for pleasure. Bottlenose dolphins are one of the very few animal species that will have sex face-to-face
    Video

    Bottlenose dolphins - An Introduction


    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    Bottlenose dolphins are color-blind and hence cannot see blue color. To able to see colors, the retina must have at least 2 different kinds of cones, with different sensitivities. Most mammals have 2 types of cones: L-cones (sensitive to long-wavelength light, red to green) and S-cones (sensitive to short-wavelength light, blue to violet or near UV). Humans and some other primates have 3 types of cones, giving them a better color vision. Only a few land mammals have only one type of cone, which means they are colorblind. All these land mammals are essentially nocturnal animals. Whales and dolphins (as well as seals and sea lions) have only one type of cone: the L-cones. Although these cones are more sensitive for short-wavelength light than the L-cones of terrestrial mammals, they still have a very low sensitivity for blue light. And because there is only one type of cone, they are essentially colorblind (although in theory it is possible that there is a very limited form of color vision in some light conditions, when both the rods and the cones are active
    Picture

    Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and can use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate sea mines or detect and mark enemy divers.
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    Bottlenose dolphins - An Introduction


    Bottlenose dolphin fun facts
    Bottlenose dolphins are color-blind and hence cannot see blue color. To able to see colors, the retina must have at least 2 different kinds of cones, with different sensitivities. Most mammals have 2 types of cones: L-cones (sensitive to long-wavelength light, red to green) and S-cones (sensitive to short-wavelength light, blue to violet or near UV). Humans and some other primates have 3 types of cones, giving them a better color vision. Only a few land mammals have only one type of cone, which means they are colorblind. All these land mammals are essentially nocturnal animals. Whales and dolphins (as well as seals and sea lions) have only one type of cone: the L-cones. Although these cones are more sensitive for short-wavelength light than the L-cones of terrestrial mammals, they still have a very low sensitivity for blue light. And because there is only one type of cone, they are essentially colorblind (although in theory it is possible that there is a very limited form of color vision in some light conditions, when both the rods and the cones are active
    Picture

    Bottlenose Dolphin is the best-known species of dolphin. They are named for their snout, which resembles the neck of a bottle. Bottlenose dolphins are classified into two main species:
    Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide. They live in groups typically of 10 – 30 members, called pods. Their diets consist mainly of fish. Bottlenose dolphins also use sound for communication, including squeaks and whistles emitted from the blowhole and sounds emitted through body movements, such as leaping from the water and slapping their tails on the water surface. They very intelligent mammals and can use tools. They have also been trained by militaries to locate sea mines or detect and mark enemy divers.
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    Bottlenose dolphin facts - Behavior and adaptation



    Dolphins and other toothed whales use echolocation to locate prey, as well as other dolphins, and to develop a picture of their surroundings. By making clicking sounds and waiting for the echo to return from surrounding objects, they can determine how far away the object is and how big it might be. Working together as a group, dolphins can trap schools of fishes or squids by rounding them up and diving into the middle to feed. The Bottlenose Dolphin is sleek and streamlined and can travel at speeds of up to 35 km per hour.
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    Bottlenose dolphin facts - communication



    Bottlenose Dolphins communicate using clicking sounds and echolocation.
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    Bottlenose dolphin facts



    Bottlenose dolphins have a prominent, curved dorsal fin with a thin trailing edge that readily tatters. This distinctive tattering has been used by researchers to identify and track individuals and groups. Bottlenose dolphins feed on many different types of prey, including shrimp, squid, other invertebrates, and fishes. The dolphins feed by nosing into near-shore rocky crevasses, by chasing fish onto mudbanks and snapping them up while they are beached, or by cooperatively herding prey into dense clusters, sometimes against a shore or up to the surface of the water. The dolphins also take advantage of human fisheries, usually by following shrimp boats for the prey that they stir up and for the catch that is tossed overboard. Bottlenose dolphins are gregarious and, at least in some near-shore societies, appear to stay together for life. Females come to sexual maturity after 5 to 12 years, and males after 9 to 13 years. There is some evidence for polygamous mating, in which there is no overt aggressive competition by either males or females for access to mates. After a gestation period of about 12 months, a single calf is born. Calves nurse for up to 18 months. The dolphins communicate by means of a rich repertoire of whistles and rasping sounds and, in at least some populations, individuals appear to have a signature whistle. Bottlenose dolphins are able to discriminate even small objects by echolocation—that is, they send out high frequency clicks that bounce off prey and other objects and use the returning echoes to distinguish the objects. For this reason most studies of echolocation in dolphins have used bottlenose dolphins as subjects. Bottlenose dolphins are often considered the most adaptable of the cetaceans because they live amid industrial activity around harbors and ship channels in many parts of the world. They have recently become the subject of dolphin watching and other tourist activities, and they are the most commonly kept dolphins in zoos and marine aquaria. Bottlenose dolphins have been hunted for meat, fertilizer, and oil, but their numbers do not appear to have been significantly reduced except in the Black Sea, where pollution and overfishing of the dolphin's prey have caused as much damage to them as direct killing. Scientific classification: The bottlenose dolphin belongs to the family Delphinidae in the suborder Odontoceti, order Cetacea. It is classified as Tursiops truncatus. found worldwide in warm and temperate seas. To prevent drowning while sleeping only half of the dolphin’s brain goes to sleep while the other half remains awake so they can continue to breathe! For example, a survey of animals in the Moray Firth in Scotland, the worlds northernmost resident population, recorded an average adult length of just under 4 metres (13 feet). This compares with a 2.5 metres (8 feet) average in a population of Florida. Those in colder waters also have a fattier composition and blood more suited to deep-diving. Bottlenose dolphins are easily recognisable by their dark and curved-back dorsal fin on their grey bodies. Every 5 – 8 minutes, the Bottlenose Dolphin, like all other dolphins, needs to rise to the surface to breathe through its blowhole, though it generally breathes more frequently – up to several times per minute. Bottlenose Dolphins live in social groups called ‘Schools’ or ‘Pods’ containing up to 12 individuals. These are long-term social units. Typically, a group of females and their young live together in a pod and juveniles in a mixed pod. Several of these pods can join together to form larger groups of one hundred dolphins or more. Male Bottlenose Dolphins live mostly alone or in groups of 2 – 3 and join the pods for short periods of time. Bottlenose Dolphins have between 40 and 52 teeth in their upper jaw and 36 – 48 teeth in their lower jaw. Their diet consists mainly of small fish, occasionally squid, crabs, octopus and other similar animals. Bottlenose Dolphins feed on around 8 – 15 kilograms of food per day. The gestation period of the female Bottlenose Dolphin is 12 months. Calves are born in midsummer in European waters and between February and May in Florida. They are born in shallow water, sometimes assisted by a ‘midwife’ (which may be a male Bottlenose Dolphin). The new single calf measures about 1 metre (3 feet) long at birth. The main breeding season for the bottlenose dolphin is between March and April. Courtship – Courtship behaviour of the male includes clinging along to the female, posing for the female, stroking, rubbing, nuzzling, mouthing, jaw clapping, and yelping. Copulation is preceded by lengthy foreplay; then the two animals arrange themselves belly to belly, the penis extends out of its slit and is inserted into the vagina. The act lasts only 10 – 30 seconds, but is repeated numerous times, with several minutes break in between. Gestation and Birth – The gestation period of the female Bottlenose Dolphin is 12 months. Calves are born in midsummer in European waters and between February and May in Florida. The young are born in shallow water, sometimes assisted by a ‘midwife’ (which may be male). The new single calf measures about 1 metre (3 feet) long at birth. To speed up the nursing process, the mother can eject milk from her mammary glands. There are two slits, one on either side of the genital slit, each housing one nipple. The calf is nursed for 12 to 18 months. The young live closely with their mother for up to 6 years. The males are not involved in the raising of their offspring. The females become sexually mature at age 5 – 12 years, the males a bit later, at the age of 10 – 12 years. Bottlenose Dolphins live in social groups called ‘Schools’ or ‘Pods’ containing up to 12 individuals These are long-term social units. Typically, a group of females and their young live together in a pod, and juveniles in a mixed pod. Several of these pods can join together to form larger groups of one hundred dolphins or more. Males live mostly alone or in groups of 2 – 3 and join the pods for short periods of time. The Bottlenose Dolphin is commonly known for its friendly character and curiosity towards humans immersed in or near water. It is not uncommon for a diver to be investigated by a group of them and they are often quite receptive to being gently patted or stroked. Occasionally, dolphins have rescued injured divers by raising them to the surface, a behaviour they also show towards injured members of their own species. Bottlenose Dolphins are predators however, and they also show aggressive behaviours. This includes fights among males for rank and access to females, as well as aggression towards sharks and other smaller species of dolphins. Male dolphins, during the mating season, compete very vigorously with each other through showing toughness and size with a series of acts such as head butting. Often seen riding the bow wave of a boat and ‘breaching’ (doing belly-flops), the Bottlenose Dolphin can leap several metres out of the water. They perform these high leaps and somersaults to breathe and also to communicate with each other. Bottlenose Dolphins sleep about eight hours a day, swim speeds of 12 miles per hour and dive for up to 20 minutes at depths of 300 metres (1,000 feet). BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN DIET Their diet consists mainly of small fish, occasionally also squid, crabs, octopus, and other similar animals. Bottlenose Dolphins feed on around 8 – 15 kilograms of food per day. Bottlenose Dolphins have 18 – 27 pairs of small conical teeth in both jaws. Their peg-like teeth serve to grasp but not to chew food. When a shoal of fish has been found, the animals work as a team to keep the fish close together and maximize the harvest. Bottlenose Dolphins also search for fish alone, often bottom dwelling species. Sometimes they will employ ‘fish whacking’ whereby a fish is stunned (and sometimes thrown out of the water) with the fluke to make catching and eating the fish easier. BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN SENSES AND COMMUNICATION Bottlenose Dolphins communicate with each other using body language and distinctive whistles, clicks and sounds produced by six air sacs near their blow hole (they lack vocal cords). Each animal has a characteristic frequency-modulated narrow-band signature vocalization (signature whistle) which is uniquely identifying. Other communications use about 30 other distinguishable sounds.
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    Bottlenose dolphin facts



    1. Dolphins frequently ride the bow wake or the stern wake of boats. They have been seen jumping as high as 4.9 m (16 ft.) out of the water and landing on their backs or sides, in a behavior called a breach. 2. Both young and old dolphins chase one another, carry objects around, toss seaweed to one another, and use objects to invite each other to interact. Such activity may be practice for catching food. 3. Bottlenose dolphins often cooperate when hunting and catching fish. In open waters, a dolphin pod sometimes encircles a large school of fish and herds them into a tight ball for easy feeding. Then the dolphins take turns charging through the school to feed. Occasionally dolphins will herd fish to shallow water where they are easy prey. 4. Bottlenose dolphins generally do not need to dive very deeply to catch food. Depending on habitat, most bottlenose dolphins regularly dive to depths of 3-46 m (10-150 ft.). They are, however, capable of diving to some depth. Under experimental conditions, a trained dolphin dove 547 m (1,795 ft.). 5. Bottlenose dolphins live in fluid social groups called pods. The size of a pod roughly varies from 2-15 individuals. Several pods may join temporarily to form larger groups called herds or aggregations. Up to several hundred animals have been observed traveling in a single herd. 6. The dolphin's sleek, fusiform body, together with its flippers, flukes, and dorsal fin, adapt this animal for ocean life. A dolphin's forelimbs are pectoral flippers. As it swims, a dolphin uses its pectoral flippers to steer and, with the help of the flukes, to stop. 7. Bottlenose dolphins routinely swim at speeds of about 5-11 kph (3-7 mph). 8. On average, a dive may last 8-10 minutes. 9. Group composition and structure often are based on age and sex. Adult males tend to group together in pairs or in threes. Females with calves associate with one another. Individuals may leave one group and join another. 10. Adults eat about 4-5% of their body weight per day. Bottlenose dolphins often cooperate when hunting and catching fish. In open waters, a dolphin group sometimes encircles a large school of fish and herds them into a tight, dense mass for easy feeding. The dolphins take turns charging through the school to feed while the others keep the fish from scattering. Occasionally dolphins herd fish to shallow water and trap them against a shore or sandbar.
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    Bottlenose dolphin facts

    interesting OMG facts for kids
    Rhythm is the longest common English word with no vowel in it.
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    Bottlenose dolphin facts - Classification



    Cetaceans include all whales, dolphins, and porpoises. Living cetaceans are further divided into two suborders: the Odontoceti (toothed whales) and the Mysticeti (baleen whales). Scientists group most dolphins in the suborder Odontoceti. Delphinids (36 species of ocean dolphins) include such well known dolphins as bottlenose dolphins and common dolphins, as well as pilot whales and killer whales.

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    Bottlenose dolphin facts - Species



    Most scientists currently recognize two species of bottlenose dolphin — the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), and the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus)
    The Burrunan dolphin (Tursiops australis) was recently recognised as a species is a species of bottlenose dolphin. Burrunan dolphin is also known as Australian bottlenose dolphin as it was found in parts of Victoria, Australia.
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    Common Bottlenose dolphin facts



    Commom Bottlenose dolphins exhibit a pronounced anterior rostrum (often referred to as a beak), typically 7-8cm (3 in.) in length that generally contains 76-98 conically-shaped, homogenous teeth. Their dorsal fin is falcate.Among the Commom Bottlenose dolphins two distinct ecotypes are recognized. The coastal ecotype typically exhibits smaller average body size with relatively larger flipper size. Comparatively, the offshore ecotype typically exhibit larger average body size and darker coloration. Atlantic bottlenose dolphins as a whole are typically smaller than Pacific bottlenose dolphins. However, bottlenose dolphins frequenting cooler, temperate waters in either ocean tend to exhibit sizes indicative of the relatively larger offshore ecotype.
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    Indo-Pacific Bottlenose dolphin facts



    The Indo-pacific bottlenose dolphin is very similar to the common bottlenose dolphin. Generally it is somewhat smaller and slimmer than its common cousin, having a less robust melon and a longer, thinner beak, which contains more teeth. The dorsal fin is broad-based and falcate, proportionately taller than that of the common bottlenose dolphin. Colouration of the Indo-Pacific dolphin is also similar to the common species; it is greyish to milky brown with a noticeably darker cape and lighter belly. Some individuals have a spotted belly, but this is highly variable among individuals and is often age-dependant. The young are generally darker and more uniform with less spots.
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    Australian Bottlenose dolphin facts



    Though the species was formally named Tursiops australis, Burrunan dolphin was recognized as a new dolphin species of bottlenose dolphin. Only two resident populations of the Burrunan dolphin have been identified, one in Port Phillip and the other in the Gippsland Lakes. The Burrunan dolphin is dark bluish-gray at the top near to the dorsal fin extending over the head and sides of the body. Along the midline it is a lighter gray which extends as a blaze over on the side near the dorsal fin. It is smaller than the common bottlenose dolphin but larger than the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin, measuring between 2.27–2.78 metres (7.4–9.1 ft) in length.
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